Diary Of A Season...2009

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Diary Of A Season...2009

Post by Gary » Sun Mar 08, 2009 2:06 pm

Postby Gary » Wed Mar 11, 2009 12:14 am

Time is crawling slowly towards our camp like an enemy in the night. If we don't get with it we could get caught scrambling for opening day...but!!!...maybe I'm over exaggerating.
Team Owner
After a succesfull 40th Anniversary, the "Giving Back Tour", we thought we'd slip out of sight until another mile stone, maybe our 45th or 50th year, because how would you top a season like the one we had. Winning on our 40th night was a dream come true, finsihing 2nd in the 100 lapper at Sauble, the last 1/2 of the season we were the highest point getter and most of all with the help of our racing peers and sponsors we gave away over 35 bikes. What next, retire? No, make our team even bigger. Don't slow down keep going as long as God is the center and we're having fun.
I explained in the thread entitled “Four Car Team”, how we became owners of a second Late Model. That acquisition, a partnership in a Thunder Car, and still in possession of our CVM, gave us a 4 car race team. The purchase of Tyler Brown's #91, a car with an incredible history dating back to 05' when Pete Vanderwyst drove it as the #7, opened the door for us to race Friday nights at Delaware with our new car and keep the #36 for Flamboro and specials. This is a new experience for Nonie and I, no kidding, but we're really looking forward to the challenges and fun we'll have this coming season.
Junior Division
We have not only expanded our race team, but have done the same with our grand children's go-karting. Last year Gehrig drove in his first season in the Cadet class. Lauren will start racing in 09 using Gehrig's kart and he will get another more updated chassis. We are getting the kids their own trailer allowing them to have a place to keep all their parts and Nonie's golf cart. They have been instructed to do good in school and so far we are pleased with their progress at school. I realize they are 10 and 9 and will be both in double digits by July, 11 and 10..yikes!!...but for some reason I can't get them to sit down and watch a 4 hour NASCAR race with me. They last until shortly after Boogity Boogity Boogity.
Lancasters
I asked the Lancaster family if they would like to be involved in this endeavor. Soon after that offer, along came Freedom Village, a blessing from God that made it possible for David and I to race the new car on Friday’s at Delaware and Jeff Lancaster to race the #9 Saturday’s at Flamboro. Teaming up with us gave Art and Jeff Lancaster a tremendous opportunity to get into Late Model racing, and young Jason a ride in our CVM to compete in one of the toughest racing series in Ontario. But 10 times more than that, it began a great relationship. This family brings so much to our team.
This partnership didn’t come without a cost for Art, Jeff and Jason. The amount of work and time they have dedicated in getting this big team ready has almost been staggering, but notwithstanding, a ton of fun. They have been overwhelmingly supportive in this awesome journey throughout the preparation stages. Their workmanship, attitude and facility have made the past three months truly amazing. Though somewhat overwhelming at times, stripping and rebuilding all 4 cars, we have managed not to have one incident that could eat up, or hinder a project such as this. We are truly gratefull to the Lancasters.
The Crew
Along with the Lancaster family others have made the work light. Jason Chapman and Tracey have worked very hard accumulating many hours in the fabricating shop. Jim, Marty, Andrew, Perry, Troy and Pastor Mike (yes Pastor) have all helped get us to where we are. Not only that, the effort put in our cars has been very professional.
A most exciting addition to our 2009 team is the recent recruiting of Glen Hills and Rick Dyson. Glen has been the Flamboro Speedway tech inspector for the past 5 or 6 years, and has a Championship to add to his resume. Like wise Rick brings a lot of experience coming from the #72 Thunder Car of Randy Rusnell, another member with Championship experience. Those two Thunder Car experts have taken over the reigns of getting our Thunder Car race ready…and competitive. They may not even know it, but our goal was to finish the CVM then get on the Thunder Car. The fear was we’d be wore out and not able to have the same enthusiasm for the TC we did for the two Late Models and Hobby car. That’s changed thanks to these two men coming on board to be part of our, now, 13 member team.

We started rebuilding our cars just after our speaking engagement at St. Anne's church on November 1st of 08'. The project was huge for me, but not as stressful as you might think, not with the team we have been blessed to have assisting from every angle. Our cars are coming together quickly. The Late Models are almost done, the CVM is being assembled after a complete facelift, and the boys are working hard on the Thunder Car.
My only fear is the CVM engine. That’s one area that will reduce us to a 3 car team very quickly. Three cars have Crate engines, and the Coupe has the inline six. More than likely it will detonate early in the season…, why do I say that?.…history, experience…and because that’s what those engines tend to do, in my car. I wished I could race in the CVM and not worry about the engine, like I have in the Late Models the past 4 years, but it won’t happen as long as the 7400 RPM screaming six is under the hood and every once in a while messing up the straight-aways with engine parts, oil, smoke and impact….okay…I digress!!
Our cars look very good and we hope they will run just as good, even the 33 Chev.
Goals
Jeff, Jason and Pastor Mike will compete for Rookie Of The Year in Late Model, CVM and Thunder Car classes. David and I are chasing the Delaware points championship by sharing the driving and being there every Friday night. I also have a desire to become a Late Model Champion, and that chase begins April 25th at Flamboro Speedway.
There's still lots to do but we’ll keep you updated as the season opener gets closer….41st season...should be the best yet!
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby troy » Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:04 am

hey gary the cars look great. sorry i havent made it to the shop. i am looking forward to another race season with you and the crew.
troy Posts: 8Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 4:16

Postby Gary » Sun Mar 15, 2009 2:21 am

The next week is crucial for us in getting the cars ready, at least everything but the Thunder Car. The Late Models should be going out for lettering, but #9 needs to be started and run for 30 minutes to break the engine in properly. Once that's done we will arrange to have both Late Models decorated.
The CVM is taking shape. We upgraded our steering shaft from the rack to the steering wheel with new himes and u-joints and steel shaft, installed a new seat, the front springs were re-arked, 4 new shocks, a new carb and distributor and basically a major face lift. David is coming over next week to help us make new body panels and a hood. Then it goes out for paint...still not sure what color, but it will be different.
The Thunder Car has been stripped with Glen and Rick making some serious recomendations. Hopefully the TC will get to the paint shop by end of the month...special thanks to Glen Ruelens for lending us his trailer for 2009. That was a huge help, saving us a ton of time.
Once the cars are done we need to safety the trailers, sort through, clean and up date our spare parts. The Lancasters are building a Pit Cart for the #9 car. They will also bring the trailers into the shop to get them both certified.
Our Junior division, the Go-Karts, still need to be gone over. We have a trailer coming for the kids so they can keep all their parts and spares in one place. We hope to get another Kart for Lauren soon. They also have to be painted and lettered, as well as one engine being rebuilt.
We also need to scale and set up all the cars once their done. Then we can rest a little...wait, no we can't, it will be opening day!!!
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby Gary » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:24 am

David came over on Monday and finished the body of the CVM. He made everything new except for the body itself. The little coupe has had a fairly in depth face lift. Hopefully it lasts us this season. Jason is very much looking forward to racing with the CVM and I am as well in the few races I'll try to compete.
Unfortunately for me, since going to Late Models, I have only had two good nights in a CVM. Winning one of the Clash features in Rick Warnes car in 07' and winning the CVM feature on July 21st of 07'. Every race prior and since have been very discouraging in terms of engine performance.
We've made some changes to the engine bolt on parts, new MSD box and distributor. As for the engine itself, it's had $10,00o spent on it in less than 20 race nights...that's enough.
The Late Models go for lettering this week end and the Coupe heads to Jim Sweers for paint.
The Thunder Car is slowly coming. It to has had some major renovations to get it completed and made competitive.
We have less than a month to get all systems done and a little rest....actually all this work hasn't been too bad, but it sure will be good when it's done.
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby Gary » Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:08 pm

April 18th Practice Day

Our entire team made it out for practice. Jim, Jeff, Art, Jason Chapman, Jason Lancaster, Perry, Marty, Tracie, Andrew, Alan and Julie.
We sure took advantage of this practice session. Last year we missed practice day and it hurt us with some serious chassis issues that led to a bad crash.
We misread the chassis set up in early 08’ and found ourselves chasing the car for a few weeks. It was incredibly frustrating because we thought the numbers were right. However the pulse for a driver is the feel of the car through the seat steering, gas pedal and brakes. We couldn’t put our finger on what the problem was. The car felt like it was on the edge, like I was driving on the edge of a cliff and had to maneuver the steering wheel back and forth to keep from spinning. The back and forth movement was actually correcting the loose condition. Finally we agreed the car needed more wedge, it would allow me to go in much harder and get on the gas sooner. We went to 2 full turns from one on the bar and felt very confident about the change. I was like a horse wanting to run but couldn’t because every time I entered the turn it was like I was on a slow spin. Naturally I had to feather the wheel and wait for 3 minutes before getting back on the gas. With the changes made there was no more feathering just drive it hard into the turn….well, that was the plan. In the first race out after the change I got into 3rd place and followed the leaders into turn 3 and the car took off as though I hit ice or oil and came to rest hard against the cement wall after spinning 180 degrees. Once in the pits we thrashed to fix bent motor mounts and other suspension parts just to get out for the feature. We soon discovered the reason we spun was because the car was still very loose, the reason for the severe wreck was because the car was driven in far too hard for the set up. We rescaled the car with wedge moving from 52% to 54% and the car was awesome. It ran that way for the rest of the season. Had the season started for us on our return on week four, we would have finished 2nd behind Jason by only one point.
On July 26th we won the feature and took all the key measurements and had the sheet laminated. That’s what was used to set both of our Late Models up for the start of 09’.
Testing #36
On April 18th, we made it out for practice and #36 was good from the first set of warm ups. Our times weren’t the best but the car was close….#9 was a different story. I wanted to test it before Jeff Lancaster got in it, just in case something went wrong because of malfunction during assembly over the winter. Many race cars have been destroyed on opening day or practice day from a stuck throttle, rad hose coming off or brakes not working. Those are the killer areas that need to be double checked prior to any testing after a winter rebuild. The #9 and #36 were both stripped totally and rebuilt. Both frames were powder coated and new parts installed where needed. There was and still is a slight hesitation on acceleration but that should be fairly easy to find. Overall the car felt good. Jeff got to test in #36 three times giving him some much needed ice time.
Testing #9
In the first set of warm ups with #9 the car would not go once on the track, it just rev’d up. One lap was all we made and then pulled off. The release bearing was cocked side ways keeping pressure on the pressure plate. That was fixed and I went out again. I knew right away the clutch was good but soon felt a very severe vibration. My first thought was something in the transmission because it was just removed. I went two or three laps with the vibration getting worse each lap. We came in found the front u-joint on the drive shaft was the wrong one making it off center. Marty went home to get the drive shaft out of David’s #37. Once installed the car was taken out for a third time. No slipping and no vibration, so that was good news. However it only took two laps for the engine to start dying after a short run. The was pushing real bad, even at low speed but the engine bogging forced me to the infield. Jeff continued on that set of hot laps in #36.
Once again #9 was taken to sick bay and we found a few things that needed attention. The push was caused by a bind in the left front upper control arm. The camber was reversed with the left front wheel tipped in at the top instead of out and out at the top on the right side instead of leaning in. We fixed that and I checked the float level. The car was almost stalling every lap and felt as though it was running out of gas. Both front and rear float levels were way off, so they were adjusted to give fuel in the turns. At idle the car was perfect, even on the track until we got close to speed. Once it started to hesitate it wouldn’t stop.
I went out for one more set of hot laps but it was no use, the car was still bogging down to the point where I had to pull over on the apron until it restarted or got more fuel.
We left the track very happy that we came out, hopefully we got rid of most of the bugs that would have plagued us on opening day. We’ll get to the bottom of the hesitation this week.

Last edited by Gary on Tue Apr 21, 2009 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm
Practice Day

Postby Slingshot » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:01 am

Uhhh Gary - I know you are not as young as you used to be, but aren't you forgetting something?
Slingshot Posts: 8Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:00 am

Postby Gary » Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:54 am

Let's see, what could I be forgetting Slingshot? Not sure. My birth certificate, drivers license, family and close friends all remind me that I'm not in my 30's, but they never tell me I'm not as young as I use to be, probably because they know that saying that would have no impact on me....I race like I have no idea how old I am. So, what I am forgetting? I'm trying to fit a corolation with what I wrote to what you wrote...now you got me in one of those rare moments in my life..I am stumped! What am I forgetting?
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Hint Hint

Postby Slingshot » Wed Apr 22, 2009 3:18 am

Ok I will give you a hint or two. It's Blue, has a number 36 on it and three crew. LOL
Slingshot Posts: 8Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:00 am

Postby Gary » Wed Apr 22, 2009 11:43 am

Oh! Yes the Thunder Car!! An update on the Thunder Car would be appropriate at this point, and perhaps the CVM, although it was the only one of the 4 car team that didn't get testing.
Thunder Car
Mike Van Slingerland, Pastor, Canadian President of Freedom Village and owner of Kettle Creek Weddings has now added to his resume "race car driver". Mike has been a race fan for ever and loves racing from every aspect. Not only did we recruit two very good crew members for our Thunder Car team, Glen Hills and Rick Dyson, through an ad we put put on the Flamboro Fan Forum, Mike also has been getting experience cutting metal, rubber and at times his own body, as he dug in helping his crew get the Thunder Car ready for pratice day. Glen contacted Flamboro and arranged for the rookie to get some extra practice laps in before the rest of the test enthusiasts showed up.
Mike accumulated over 200 laps in the Olds Cutlass and loved every third mile circuit. I was unable to spend much time asking questions or getting feed back from his day because of the issues we had with the Late Models. Hopefully we get to see all of Mike’s heats and most of his features. Our feature is usually scheduled right after the TC main event, but I should be able to catch most of the twenty five lapper.
His Camaro won’t be race ready for two weeks making the Olds his ride for at least the first few scheduled events. The Camaro, formerly belonging to Bill Jackson, is currently getting painted and will then go to Steve Lyons for lettering. The paint scheme will be the same as the #9 Late Model.
Mike has been very good to me since our first encounter in August of 08'. It's a little weird, some may have thought I would be slowing down, but my racing efforts have exploded in 09'. There is a lot more on my plate for this season, financially and work load wise. Overseeng 3 of the four cars is a fairly intense commitment but with the help of Nonie, my family, Mike, our crew and the Lancaster family, I should stay clear of the race asylum.
CVM
Unfortunately for Jason Lancaster the CVM missed practice day. The Coupe was in the middle of being repainted at Jim Sweers. Had it been painted, practice day was out of the question due to the amount of work left. As well, the 33 Chev still has to be lettered by Steve Lyons before entering the race track to splatter engine parts all over southern Ontario...what!!!.....that's so negaitve!!!....one day in 81 I was in my driveway rebuilding my inline. I would have been labelled a "suicide bomber" as I meticulously prepare my grenade. I love Coupes, my only issue is the engine and it's obvious determination to take me out of many races and help slam me into the cement at 75 mph....
We hope the inline will give us the whole season. With the other three cars running Crates, we have no worry about the engines, our number one fear with the Coupe is blowing up….only because I have sent many inline assemblies to the Buzz N’ Blow cemetery.
I really hope the Crate engine is accepted as an alternative engine for the Hobby Club. If it doesn’t happen for 2010, I may not run the Coupe after 09. One thing is certain, if the six has any issues this season we have no budget left to repair the engine. Plus, even if I had money I won’t invest anymore to fix what has been the single biggest cost in my racing career. It would be cheaper to get Jason Lancaster another Late Model.
The CVM will be painted like our #36 Late Model and the plan is for Jason to drive it 13 of the 17 scheduled races and I will get a chance to run it on 4 dates.
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby Shammy Racing » Wed Apr 22, 2009 3:41 pm

Hi Gary,
You and I have talked on the Vintagemods site a few times. I'm just wondering where the photos for the other cars are?! The 36 looks great be the way! Lyons did a really good job. I was on Dave Frank's website and saw the #9 there and it looks great. You should have it on your site. I noticed a couple new sponsors on the side of that car, ex. Tire Discounter. When is the press release going to be posted?
Shammy Racing Posts: 6Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 3:37 pm

Postby Shammy Racing » Thu Apr 23, 2009 4:53 pm

That was quick! LoL Thanks Gary, both cars look great.
Shammy Racing Posts: 6Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 3:37 pm

Postby Gary » Fri Apr 24, 2009 2:01 pm

Thank you. We spend as much time on how we look as making sure we get the best car possible on the track. Our sport is fan driven, which should inspire all racers to provide our fans and sponsors an entertaining night of competition in great looking machines. The race facility should lead the way in making our sport appealing to fans and sponsors. They attain that level of professionalism by making sure the race track is top notch in every aspect of customer satisfaction by setting the standard and leading by example. Even sponsors not involved with a specific race car appreciate an arena filled with beautifully painted chariots. I’ve noticed more and more race teams are concentrating on bringing well painted and lettered cars to the track. If they keep doing that they will benefit by attracting sponsors to their race team.
There is a Quaker State press release coming out very soon, hopefully by the end of next week. The Freedom Village press release was on our front page for three weeks. If you go into Late Model History, click on 2009, you’ll find it if you scroll down. Hope to see you at the races soon.
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby Shammy Racing » Fri Apr 24, 2009 11:26 pm

Yeah I saw the Freedom Village Press Release. The home page still has that blurb at the top saying a press release with driver sponsor relationships. That's all I was wondering Gary.
Good luck this season to you and your whole team and we'll see you at the track!
Shammy Racing Posts: 6Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 3:37 pm

Postby Gary » Sat Apr 25, 2009 2:53 am

Thank you...one more sleep...then a charge for the Championship
Gary Posts: 940Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:20 pm

Postby Gary » Mon Apr 27, 2009 1:42 am

High Winds..Hard Rain..Lightning..Cancel Our First Race

Opening day saw some crazy wild weather, forcing the first race cancellation for 2009. We had everything but an earthquake and tornado. Going through either of those events has eluded me for 60 plus years and I’m good with that.
However what we did get was a first for me. I don’t ever remember experiencing the sustained high winds we saw Saturday at Flamboro, very hard and for forty minutes at least. It was all over Ontario causing havoc everywhere and messing up opening day.
John will rerun this later in the summer on a Sunday. We have no idea when it will be scheduled, but we do know it won’t be on a week end when Late Models are not scheduled for Flamboro.
We didn’t get on the track for practice. We did finally get to tech after about an hour outside. They were doing a fairly thorough check on all the cars. When we got there they decided to just scale the cars from then on, I guess to save time. They gave us the numbers on a piece of paper and we found those chassis weights way out compared to our numbers taken at home.
After the races were called we decided to put the car on the stands at home and re scale it. We confirmed the numbers they gave us were quite a ways off, other than the total. The total weight they had was 2932 and at home we got 2931, so that was close. The rest of the key stats, left side percent, cross and corner weights were all out. Maybe we weren’t on the scales properly at the track. They were trying to get all of the cars through in a hurry.
Looks like I will start the season off in the #9 car at Delaware this Friday night. David will be there in the Pennzoil car. We have set up the #9 so just a few adjustments have to be made to make the car legal from one track to the other.
Looking forward to next week end…two race nights!!!

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:06 pm

April 18th Practice Day

Our entire team made it out for practice. Jim, Jeff, Art, Jason Chapman, Jason Lancaster, Perry, Marty, Tracie, Andrew, Alan and Julie.
We sure took advantage of this practice session. Last year we missed practice day and it hurt us with some serious chassis issues that led to a bad crash.
We misread the chassis set up in early 08’ and found ourselves chasing the car for a few weeks. It was incredibly frustrating because we thought the numbers were right. However the pulse for a driver is the feel of the car through the seat steering, gas pedal and brakes. We couldn’t put our finger on what the problem was. The car felt like it was on the edge, like I was driving on the edge of a cliff and had to maneuver the steering wheel back and forth to keep from spinning. The back and forth movement was actually correcting the loose condition. Finally we agreed the car needed more wedge, it would allow me to go in much harder and get on the gas sooner. We went to 2 full turns from one on the bar and felt very confident about the change. I was like a horse wanting to run but couldn’t because every time I entered the turn it was like I was on a slow spin. Naturally I had to feather the wheel and wait for 3 minutes before getting back on the gas. With the changes made there was no more feathering just drive it hard into the turn….well, that was the plan. In the first race out after the change I got into 3rd place and followed the leaders into turn 3 and the car took off as though I hit ice or oil and came to rest hard against the cement wall after spinning 180 degrees. Once in the pits we thrashed to fix bent motor mounts and other suspension parts just to get out for the feature. We soon discovered the reason we spun was because the car was still very loose, the reason for the severe wreck was because the car was driven in far too hard for the set up. We rescaled the car with wedge moving from 52% to 54% and the car was awesome. It ran that way for the rest of the season. Had the season started for us on our return on week four, we would have finished 2nd behind Jason by only one point.
On July 26th we won the feature and took all the key measurements and had the sheet laminated. That’s what was used to set both of our Late Models up for the start of 09’.
Testing #36
On April 18th, we made it out for practice and #36 was good from the first set of warm ups. Our times weren’t the best but the car was close….#9 was a different story. I wanted to test it before Jeff Lancaster got in it, just in case something went wrong because of malfunction during assembly over the winter. Many race cars have been destroyed on opening day or practice day from a stuck throttle, rad hose coming off or brakes not working. Those are the killer areas that need to be double checked prior to any testing after a winter rebuild. The #9 and #36 were both stripped totally and rebuilt. Both frames were powder coated and new parts installed where needed. There was and still is a slight hesitation on acceleration but that should be fairly easy to find. Overall the car felt good. Jeff got to test in #36 three times giving him some much needed ice time.
Testing #9
In the first set of warm ups with #9 the car would not go once on the track, it just rev’d up. One lap was all we made and then pulled off. The release bearing was cocked side ways keeping pressure on the pressure plate. That was fixed and I went out again. I knew right away the clutch was good but soon felt a very severe vibration. My first thought was something in the transmission because it was just removed. I went two or three laps with the vibration getting worse each lap. We came in found the front u-joint on the drive shaft was the wrong one making it off center. Marty went home to get the drive shaft out of David’s #37. Once installed the car was taken out for a third time. No slipping and no vibration, so that was good news. However it only took two laps for the engine to start dying after a short run. The was pushing real bad, even at low speed but the engine bogging forced me to the infield. Jeff continued on that set of hot laps in #36.
Once again #9 was taken to sick bay and we found a few things that needed attention. The push was caused by a bind in the left front upper control arm. The camber was reversed with the left front wheel tipped in at the top instead of out and out at the top on the right side instead of leaning in. We fixed that and I checked the float level. The car was almost stalling every lap and felt as though it was running out of gas. Both front and rear float levels were way off, so they were adjusted to give fuel in the turns. At idle the car was perfect, even on the track until we got close to speed. Once it started to hesitate it wouldn’t stop.
I went out for one more set of hot laps but it was no use, the car was still bogging down to the point where I had to pull over on the apron until it restarted or got more fuel.
We left the track very happy that we came out, hopefully we got rid of most of the bugs that would have plagued us on opening day. We’ll get to the bottom of the hesitation this week.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri May 01, 2009 2:06 pm

May 2nd...........Flamboro Speedway

Race #1

High Lites
* 19 cars
* Jason Shaw wins
* No David
* We finish 10th
* Very competitive field
* Jason has rough outing in CVM
* 7 Hobby cars finish feature

Results
#36......Heat 8th Feature 10th
#9........Heat 9th Feature 15th
CVM.....Heat DNF Feature DNF 16th

Winnings
#36......$220
#9........$180
CVM.....$100

Repairs
#36.......minor body and hood damage…routine
#9.........none….get ready for Delaware
CVM......engine, body, chassis, steering, pretty much everything

Crew
#36......Jim, Jason, Perry, Marty
#9........Tracey, Alan,
CVM......Art, Andrew

Conclusion
It was one of those nights when it just felt like something was going to go wrong. Maybe I need to get use to that fact, especially with a four-car team. My boys will be hounding me to concentrate on #36 and I know I can do that because the Lancaster's are very capable of looking after their cars with the boys they have and Pastor Mike has a great crew as well. Wait till he gets the Camaro Thunder Car out....look out!!
Our Go-Kart division did awesome in the morning. Lauren, in her debut finished 2nd in the Cadet B feature. She was smooth and didn’t spin or get mixed up with any of the other kids. It sure was quite a feat for her in her first feature race. Gehrig moved up to the Novice class and did very well in his up-dated Kart. He finished 6th after starting 10th in a fairly competitive field.
We made it to the track in lots of time to get ready for the nights races. My goal was to get both the #9 Late Model and CVM shaken down before either Jeff or Jason Lancaster took them out. The only reason for me to do that was because neither car had ran a good set of hot laps after being totally rebuilt. The results were good for the two machines and I readily handed the reigns to both the eager racers.
Jeff and I went to the tower to sign in and draw for position. I picked #18 and told Bob Monroe that was Jeff’s number and he was picking for me. Bob just looked at me and said “right”. Then Jeff picked #19. Great, both of us would be at the rear of the heat. Jeff was going to the rear anyway, but with only one heat drawing a good position is very important and very lucky. It’s a double slam when your running for points. Starting at the back in a competitive field makes it tough to gain spots and therefore points. The first three weeks are heads up so qualifying poor gives you a feature starting spot back in the grid.
Our heat was tough. The pack stayed together for the first half of the race and other than the leaders no one could really go anywhere. Mike Bentley #99 got into someone up front and got blacked. That was too bad for him, he is improving every year but in this race somehow got himself in trouble.
We ended up 8th and Jeff finished 9th. They had said there was going to be a consi but cancelled it. We would start the feature in 15th spot.
This years Late Model line up will be very exciting if the boys who were there on opening day, all return. The cars are close and most are running very close. The tight competition is a direct result of the Crate engine. Racers are able to go a few years without worrying about any engine problems and learn how to make their cars get around the track. More Late Models are hitting the mid 15’s and soon we’ll be into the 15:3’s just by improving the cars each week.

The feature was going to be a walk away with the top cars up front. Qualifying was heads up with the top qualifiers starting up front and the rest of us looking from the rear with binoculars. I watched, when it was safe, at the race up front. Scott Lyons was on the pole by virtue of his heat win. He was passed early by Paul Howse and then Jason Shaw. I was surprised to see Scott running 3rd. After a lap or so I couldn’t watch anymore because there was too much going on a few inches in front of my hood. We were in a tight pack. Our car felt very good but really couldn’t go anywhere.

Few Care About Appearance This Year
I was trying to make sure I didn’t hit anyone but others were racing like they were contestants on American Idol. Some of the cars I was with still had the same finger prints on their cars from 08’. They didn’t rebuild their cars and if they did it didn’t include any body or paint work. So here I am fighting in the middle of guys that love to rub because it doesn’t matter what happens to their racer. I know we are going to get beat up, especially when starting at the back. But when cars drive into the your car to gain spots it becomes a little frustrating. It wasn’t epidemic or real serious but it did happen. We battled with a number of good runners. Holmes, Forth, Boschler, Farrley, Laking and Adams. The cars were very tight, and racing hard on a tight track makes things even tougher…we were in a bull ring.
We ran close and were lapping cars when going into turn one Junior tried going under me and Pee Wee on the outside. We were almost 4 wide and they were bouncing off my car. I got in the gas to get away from the aggressiveness and got into the back of the #3 of Boschler. Then the caution came out. On the restart we hoped for a better lane, and a path way out of this school of fish. We restarted 9th. That run lasted a few laps before Shane Gowan got into it with Kenny. Shane spun, I headed up the track in turn one but the hole was closing so I gradually applied the brakes so I could ease up out of the way. By the time the speedy dry settled I was tagged by a couple of cars but not real serious. Now we were at the back again. I was thinking I might need a new paint job after our first race. On that restart we hardly went three more laps and things boxed up. Steve Laking went in so deep he got into the gravel and spun putting himself up on the wall and ended up on the exit of the track with his car steaming. He was okay but surely not happy. We miss Brock Laking and this night would not have been the same for Steve with his dad not there to coach and encourage him on. Every lap we went around under the yellow, I wanted to go over to Steve and give him a hug. I kept saying he’ll be okay but it’s tough to lose your dad especially when he is so involved in your sport like Brock was with Steve. Anyway a little prayer was said to comfort Steve as he climbed all over his car trying to get it out of the track exit in turn 2.
On the restart it was obviously things changed up front. The usual suspects were there, Jason, Jeff Stewart, Scott and Todd Campbell. There was a new kid there as well, Super Late convert #03 Shane Maginnis. I could only watch those guys under the yellow because I still had 5 laps left to beat the car up some more. The restart was clean and soon we were all over Paul Howse who was suffering engine woes. I caught up to Junior Farrell in the dying laps but could only tease him, or myself. I would have had to hit him to gain a spot and I find it still impossible to hit cars to pass. My downfall maybe. Here’s a message for all my competitors---“you can push Gary around and more than likely he won’t do anything about it because he is a clean driver”. That’s what they say, but just to add clarity to that statement, the truth is “Gary doesn’t hit anyone to pass them because he feels it’s not the right thing to do”. Anyway we ended up 10th and sort of glad that we survived our first night although I lost 9 decals and a part of our number on the passenger side.
Junior Farrley came over after the race and thanked me for running him clean. You know what…I would sooner that scenario any day then someone coming over freaking out on me because I spun them out. Respect deserves respect. I’m certain the cars that tagged me tried very hard not to. All in all it was a good start.
Our next race is this Friday at Delaware. Jeff will drive #9 and I will be in David’s Pennzoil car…if it don’t rain.
Jeff finished 15th in his debut but the good news is all his decals are still on the car.
Hopefully we get a better starting spot next time out. We tried telling the track they needed to run double heats because it wasn’t fair with only one heat…they didn’t understand what we were talking about. Maybe next year they’ll get it right.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Thu May 07, 2009 2:06 pm

May 8th...............Delaware Speedway

JBM Auto Leasing Triple Crown

RAINED OUT

High Lites
* 30 Late Models
* Lightning display during time trials
* Qualify 18th 19:54
* Axle breaks on Pennzoil car in warm ups
* No radio’s for #9 in feature
* Jason Shaw had an awful night
* We were okay with 2nd chance due to rain out

Crew #37 & #9
* Jim, Jason, Tracey, Perry, Troy, Ken and Linda.

Conclusion
We’ve been to the races four times in 09 and three have rained out. It wasn’t really a bad thing because we were in trouble when our radio’s went on the #9 car and the Pennzoil car broke an axle shaft putting it out of contention because of no spare.
David asked me if I would run his car for this race because he was the best man at Eddie Askin’s wedding. I agreed and asked Jeff Lancaster to drive the #9 for me. Here is how the points work…Delaware APC points and the JBM Auto Leasing Triple Crown series points go to the car # not the driver. You can have as many drivers as you want on a car as long as the drivers are track members. There is also a third points series based on NASCAR driver points. A NASCAR driver gets points every time he drives his own car, or anyone else's. He also gets points at any NASCAR sanctioned event. If we go to Pittsburg or Erie we'll get NASCAR driver points.
Anyone who owns and drives their own car will get points in all the standings if they are a NASCAR member. In tonight's race, I would get NASCAR driver points, as would Jeff for driving in the race and being NASCAR members. I would also get owner points from Jeff driving the number 9, because I own that car and am the registered owner. David would get owner points because I was driving his car..confused yet?.....me either.
We got to the track as early as possible. Even with getting there at 5:30 we were too late because all the parking spots on the asphalt were taken. We ended up on the dirt with Jason Shaw and a few other Late Model racers. In the drivers meeting later, Jeff Wilcox told all racers the paved pits were for Late Models.

We got through Tech with some minor issues. They didn't like our spoiler. We use it to advertise for our sponsors but they want it to be clear, nothing on it. We will have to change the spoilers on both cars for next week. I don't agree with it, the track official said "it's so drivers behind can see through your spoiler, then through both your windows and be able to see the car in front of the car in front of you". I replied "What!!..are you kidding"? That doesn't make sense. I tried to imagine someone doing that, I don't think I ever have looked through a spoiler to see a car in front of the car in front of me...never....ever...and that's 40 years of never's.... But, it's a rule so we will comply.
We were busy trying to get me fitted in the #37. Radios wouldn’t work because the connectors were too far away from my helmet. David had them set up for his helmet. We missed two sets of warm ups getting ready. Jeff was able to get the #9 out and found it okay. We made the final set of warm ups but couldn’t go anywhere. There was something seriously wrong with the car. When I got on the gas the car just spun the wheels and when I let off the gas the car was out of control. Jim kept telling me to go high. “okay, go to the wall now, go go go”. But I replied.. “no way, I can’t drive this car”. I pulled off after a few laps of not being able to get any speed. I told the crew something is wrong with the car, something must be broke in the suspension. After a few minutes they found the broken axle shaft. Mike McColl tried to find one for us but to no avail. Jeff asked me to drive the #9, I asked if he was sure about that and he said he wanted me to drive it. We talked to the track staff and they immediately said it was okay because time trials had not started. We started preparing the #9 for me to do time trials. There was no way the #37 was going out. Soon we heard there was no spare parts available.
After practice, at the drivers meeting Jeff said there were 29 cars signed in, an incredible turn out. The race was scheduled to start 28 cars, but Jeff said he would start 29, he only had enough to payout the top 28, and would give the extra car a cheque…how good and smart is that. Talk about showing racers how much you care about them. The gesture brought an applause for the track management. Some tracks (Flamboro for sure) would not have allowed more cars to go into the race, let alone pay them. It ended up that another car came to race the track still agreed to run everyone.....nice.
Once the meeting was over we went to time trials. Our feature would be the first one out after heat qualifying by the Trucks and Modifieds.
I had no practice in the #9 Freedom Village Impala. I also wasn’t very comfortable either because of the bigger steering wheel, being too far from the gas and brake pedal and not sitting quite like I do in the #36 car. I just love getting in #36, I guess it’s a perfect fit for me and when the car feels good the driver can get into the competition much better. Having one uncomfortable system is bad enough, having three or four is not good. However, what was good was the fact in time trials you’re all alone and no need to worry about being too slow for the car behind. I needed lots of laps in this car as well as some extra time to get the comfort zone up, but neither would happen now….and I would sooner go on the track and do the best I can rather than give up because the car wasn’t perfect…not to go on about this for ever, but being comfortable in a race car is not only a must, it will improve the cars performance.
My first timed lap was 19:91, and most of that was just getting use to how far I could go into the turn. I knew it would be safer for me and the other 28 cars if I started near the back because of not feeling quite at home in this car, although I really do like it and will soon get it measured to fit. Jeff drives it at Flamboro so I need to compromise with Jeff and make it so both of us are happy with the car. Coming for the 2nd lap I wanted to go even harder but still wasn’t sure of me or the car but got our times down to a 19:54. That put us 18th on the grid.

Chaos Before The Feature...or Was It Just The Theme For The Whole Night
Things went haywire in the pits for us. We were trying to get me set in the #9 but not having good luck. I would have to get it right because things changed for this year at Delaware. Originally David and I were to share the driving in the #9 switching every other night, but he decided to run his own #37 for the full season (except for tonight because of the wedding). He felt I wouldn't mind running the extra nights, and he was right, my only problem was getting settled in the car. Finally the track staff came over and said to get in line on pit row. We told them we were having trouble with the helmet and radio set up. The official said “ok, but take the car out on pit lane and fix it there”. So out I go and as soon as I got to pit row they motioned me to my starting spot, then the field started out on the track. I felt so dumb with no helmet on. The line up men were waving me out to follow the 17th place car…”come on, let’s go” they yelled. “What about my helmet”? I innocently asked. The guy looked at me, "where's your helmet"? My crew came running with it. "is it mandatory"? I tried to joke and buy time. Anyway it wasn’t their fault, we were scrambling.
When I got on the track I was confronted with the fact our radios were not working. The starter was waving me to go up front. Meanwhile I’m trying to make contact with my spotter “Hello, hello…check one, two, ..anybody there”? No answer, and no way am I going to take my spot in one of the biggest and toughest fields in my 5 years in this class….with no radio’s? I’ll pass thanks. Hey, it's scary enough racing at 125 mph with everything working good. Actually once the green drops fear leaves and insanity takes over. So, I go to the back constantly trying to see if my radio is turned on, or I’m on the right channel. It was nuts. I was so caught up in getting my radio fixed that Jeff, with his one shafted sick Pennzoil Late Model, almost got by me on the green because I wasn’t in a hurry to head into that forest without someone telling me who is high or low. It’s possible to run a race without radio’s, and if you know it before you go on the track, you prepare yourself. Once your on the track and find out you don’t have them it’s a different deal.
Anyway soon I realized I couldn’t make communication with Jim and figured I better communicate with the throttle and get going. On lap two coming off turn four we were lapping Jeff in David's car. It was 3 wide going down the front chute and cars were bunched up everywhere. Going into turn one the yellow came out when someone spun. I immediately headed for the pits and so did Jeff. He accomplished what he had to, taking the green to get David starting points and last place money for this show. Meanwhile I was trying to see if the boys could fix my radio’s. Jim was waiting for me when I came down pit row. They checked connectors and the radio channel but couldn’t find anything obvious. I went back out. On lap 4 the yellow came out again when Jason Shaw and Matt Box got mixed up. Jason took a real hard hit into the back straight wall. He was done. I went back into the pits in hopes our crew could find out what was wrong with the radio. Someone said, “it’s starting to rain”. No sooner had that been said when it started to pour…huge rain drops. The rains never let up for a while and the track decided to call it.
Next week we’ll run this race first, from lap 4 and then run the regular nights races.
Jeff Wilcox came over to our trailer just before the race was called and told us the Pennzoil car was two laps down. He said he would get the lucky dog right away when the race resumed and then another on the next caution because he was the only car any laps down. He also said that David could drive the car next week. I asked if that would be ok since David didn’t qualify the car. Jeff said it was because if a driver got sick and couldn’t finish the race another registered driver could drive the car. What a break for David. He will get to fix the car, restart only a lap down and if he’s got any luck will get his other lap back soon after the race restarts. We’ll get to fix our radio’s as well, and I will be happy to hear buddy Jim say “clear high”.
Can’t wait to run this show next week. The talent in this race is quite awesome and I’m proud to be in it.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Thu May 14, 2009 2:06 pm

May 15th..............Delaware Speedway

JBM Auto Leasing Triple Crown

Race #2 (1st Delaware Race)

High Lites
* 29 Late Models
* Ron Sheridan Wins
* 2nd feature rained out
* David takes 4th
* We finish 16th
* too many cautions…I caused 2
* announcer had Jeff Lancaster or David Lancaster driving the #9

Results
Feature
#9…16th
#37..4th

Winnings
#9….$140
#37...$450

Repairs
Chassis, routine check, need to find out why we are so loose

Crew
* Jim, Jason, Jeff, Tracey, Alan, Troy, Ken and Linda.

Conclusion
This may have been one of my worst nights in some time, especially with the fact we had a potentially good car. We could not get a handle on the chassis. I must conclude, being one of our most frustrating nights with some dangerous moments, God answered our prayers by keeping all racers safe, and allowing us to leave with a fairly unscathed race car. I thank Him for that.
Here’s what transpired throughout the night.
In our first set of warm ups we spun out in turn two, doing a 360, and we were very lucky not to get hit. The reason? The surge tank was filled to the top and only should only be topped up half way. The water came out the over flow hose and spilled on my right side tires sending me around. We fixed that and went out again with a good set of hot laps. We got our times down to the 19:2’s and the car felt okay.
In the feature I started 26th. Only Jason Shaw was missing from last week. His crash beat his car up quite badly. Also, Jason will be running for the title again at Flamboro and most likely won’t run Delaware on a night before a Flamboro race. On the start of this race we ran about one or two laps and some cars got together in turn the middle of one and two. I knew almost immediately our car wasn’t right. Going into the turns the car felt slightly on edge. The more I drove it the more evident it became how loose the car was.
It’s a known fact the most dangerous car set up is a loose car. You’ll hear many NASCAR drivers complain the loudest when their cars are loose, because it is next to impossible to race. In order to keep up you drive harder and going to the outside is where we can gain the most and that’s usually where the loose condition shows up. Go in deep, get on the gas quick and around you go. On a big Super Speedway, drivers will go in and stay high because they don’t have to turn the car as much. Delaware doesn’t allow for that.
We came in for a chassis adjustment putting a turn on the front sway bar. Then after a short run of about 4 or 5 laps there was a huge crash on the back chute involving at least 10 cars. The red flag was thrown as they closed the track to get cars towed off. That put us about 14th on the restart. I hoped we had it fixed this time. We were smack in the middle of the field and I couldn’t back off going into the turn knowing cars would be on my tail. It didn’t take long for us to find out we were still in trouble. Going down the back chute I stayed glued to the car in front. As we picked up speed in between the turns my car suddenly came around, instantly. I was shocked. Lucky for us, no one hit me. I came back into the pits and we added more air to the left rear to close up the stagger.
This went on all night. We made at least 5 pit stops during this 50 lap race and each time we made a changed we hoped it would make the car better. A wreck going into 3 a few laps later sent other cars to the pits. We got into the back of David and spun but no damage. I made a brake adjustment on that stop. Another caution fell on about lap 30. Cars were flying everywhere and we got through okay. Jim asked me if I wanted to come in but I felt the car was a little better so I stayed out. We went around at least 8 times under caution as the starter kept telling drivers to go to the rear. There were 4 or 5 who would not go back and even when they did it took them 3 laps to slow get to the rear. Finally we got going and got another two laps when Scott McGillvary #91 got knocked into the turn 3 wall. His car was beat up fairly bad. We got up to 11th for the next restart and I thought the car was okay, it seemed like it could be driven hard and was not loose. We restarted behind #22 Jamie Ramsay who was 9th. Coming off 4 we got a good run and about half way down the front chute Jamie moved in front of the 8th place car, diving to the inside. I took his spot and moved from 11th to 7th going into one and got a great run off two to pull ahead of #89 Drew Spicer. We were one straightaway from moving into 7th place. However, we have to back up a bit to where we were exiting turn two beside #89. I pulled ahead of him by almost a car length when my car literally took off. The car just spun instantly…there I used that term again. I was in unbelief. Reality soon set in as I was now crossing the path of the 4 cars I just passed and the other 12 behind them. Spicer clipped my right rear wheel as he checked up a little trying not to t-bone me and get wrecked himself. My car slid towards the inner retaining wall and all I could think of was slamming hard into that unmoveable cement. Somehow the car did a full spin and stayed off both the grass and wall and by the time I was facing turn three I was almost to the exit in the middle of the back chute. Still at a high speed I seen three cement blocks awaiting me but the brakes got me stopped about 2 inches from the huge concrete sugar cubes. Man I was lucky. I had barely time to say “thank you Lord”, when my spotter was yelling “go, go , go”. Jim didn’t realize I was parked in front of the wall death and I said “I have no where to go, I have to back up”. We were so lucky, well maybe not, we prayed for safety, and I believe God kept all of us from getting hurt.
Back into the pits I went and the boys added more air pressure to the left rear. My heart was not in it now. That was the second caution I caused and I didn’t want to do affect the race program anymore. Perhaps the biggest thing that dampened my spirit was how fast the car came around when I was doing what I’ve done for years…pass cars on the outside. We had an amazing run going when the car just turned. I’m sure I wasn’t hit, maybe I drove it to hard, but that doesn’t make sense because racing hard is what were suppose to do once we’re comfortable with being in the heat of a race. For the rest of the race I cruised around at a safe pace about 75 car lengths from the closest car. We ended up 16th, a disappointment but not so much when I knew what could have happened.
Congrats to Ron Sheridan and his team for a great win. Steve Roblee, Jesse Kennedy for 2nd and 3rd and David for taking 4th.
David came over to me after the race and we talked about my troubles. He said he thought it was more than likely me driving the car too hard, especially on the outside. He knows I run hard on the outside and did it forever with him in the Hobbies. He said “dad, you have to feather it when you’re on the outside, you can’t get on it hard. You can on the inside of the track but not on the outside”. I told David “The reason I did it last year here was because of the 10” tires”? He agreed.
Jim and I talked it over after with our crew. We decided to go back to our original set up, but add more static wedge. I am going to check into possible spring rates for the right rear. I find it hard to believe that I can’t go in hard and get on the gas right away, but maybe the boy is right, maybe slow is faster in this case.
Anyway we are very thankful the car was not hurt to bad. We did bend the track bar and crack the sub chassis. Both were fixed before the rain came and cancelled our 2nd feature.
Jeff Lancaster was given credit for most of the night for racing the #9. He does drive the #9 at Flamboro. My grand children went to the tower to tell them Jeff wasn’t driving the car. They announced then that David Lancaster was racing the #9. Who is David Lancaster? Then it was David Elliott….and finally they got it right and announced Gary Elliott. We got paid after the races and the cheque was made out to Jeff Lancaster. I checked the web site today and both my cars #9 and #36 are registered with Jeff Lancaster as the driver. I am definitely in the Twilight Zone right now. Anyway we can change the Delaware drivers roster with Jeff as back up driver, and get the right info to the announcers re who is driving …and hopefully we can get the #9 to handle at Delaware. Regardless we look forward to coming back in two weeks.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri May 15, 2009 2:06 pm

May 16th .................Flamboro Speedway

Race #3....#2 at Flamboro

High Lites
* 16 cars
* Shane Maginnis wins…but gets D’Q’d
* Scott Lyons wins feature
* We get 3rd
* Feature non stop but tight
* Jeff Lancaster learning the ropes
* Bad luck strikes Pastor Mike for his new Thunder Car debut

Results
Heat #36……4th Feature #36….3rd
Heat # 9……6th Feature # 9….14th

Winnings
#36…$400
# 9…$200

Repairs
Routine check over, fix oil leak

Crew
Jason, Tracey, Perry, Marty, Sarah

Conclusion
Rain has been the headline so far in racing news. Flamboro had already lost 2 nights to rain prior to this week end and had it not been a “rain date” week end, we would have lost another. Saturday was miserable, cold and wet. John called it fairly early and we got lucky because we could watch the NASCAR All Star race.
We had more than just the race car to prep for on this Sunday night show. It was cold. There were no clouds, only bright sun and a strong wind that made us freeze because of the low temperatures. We made sure we bundled up knowing once the sun headed west we were going to be colder. Nonie suggested I wear long underwear, take my heavy jacket and wear a toque to keep my ears warm. The toque had Sauble Speedway on it, and I sort of felt awkward wearing it, but then I reminded myself, Flamboro has never given me a toque, so I took it to the track.
We arrived early on and made it through tech okay. We take our cars through tech in simulated post race conditions. We set the outside tires at 30 psi (the temp they reach when hot) and set the front and rear stagger at the settings they would be after a race. After tech we reset the tires at the lower pre race set up for practice. Jeff Lancaster and I talked earlier in the week about going out together and giving him a chance to follow me around. This would give him an idea of how hard to go in the turns and a good line to run.
We got on the track and instructed our spotters to let us know when we were at the back so we could work together with no other cars around us. Once the green dropped Jason would let me know how close Jeff was so I would know to go in deeper or wait a little. The first lap or so I heard “he’s 2 car lengths behind you”. I sped up a bit and suddenly my car started smoking, but more like burning. I told Jason “I got to pull off something is wrong, I think the engine may be on fire”. I pulled to the infield, as I did the starter motioned to me that I was smoking. The smell was terrible, like brake fluid or power steering fluid burning on the exhaust. I went to the infield and while there tried to figure what we did or didn’t do that could have caused this. Then I remembered that David had change my valve springs this past week and possibly it was oil on the exhaust, but it didn’t smell like oil. I waited till practice was over and went to the pits.
Once I got to the pit pad Perry came to my window and said “wow, what a terrible smell”. We quickly removed the hood to see what was causing this awful burning smell. Then we found it. How could this have happened. I would never have guessed we would find this as the cause of us missing testing with Jeff, feeling nauseated from the fumes, even accusing my son (just for a second) of maybe causing an oil leak. This was certainly a very weird deal. It wasn’t brake fluid, or power steering fluid leaking on the headers. By now you’re wondering what it could have been. All I can say is this…my crew and I had a good laugh, but I knew I was going to be in trouble when I got home and had to tell Nonie that the new Sauble toque she gave me was pretty much melted and burned up. I couldn’t figure how it got there. I must have taken it off when we changed the jets in the carb and it blew in the engine right on the headers. We had a similar event like that happen in my Hobby days when I left a rag under the hood and it caught fire. I drove to the infield and the fire truck blasted the engine and then we found the rag….how dumb….30 years later it’s a black toque…again…how dumb.
We drew poorly tonight..22..but it gave me outside pole. This was no night to have outside pole. The track was missing the outside groove, especially with the cold and so much rain the past week.
Anyway we started beside Richard Holmes and I knew my only hope to get past him was getting a quick start and try to be ahead going into one then pull him off turn two. That idea was about as possible as returning to Nonie an unscathed toque.
We got hot laps to warm the tires and immediately doubled up for the white. My spotter said “you know what to do”. I knew alright and I figured Richard knew as well. Maybe he’d be a little slow at the start, spin tires or get sideways. We came into three and I was on the gas slowly gaining speed. We came off together, I may have had a foot on him but going into one I had to stay up to give him room in case he slid up into me. We came off turn two a little ahead, but Richard was right there. He dove hard into three and that was where I should have pulled ahead but he stayed with me and we raced down the front chute into one and as I dove in hard my car came around spinning to a stop away from the wall and the other racers. Too much rear brake was the culprit, but I needed to do that to have any chance to win. So we restarted 8th and managed to get up to 4th. Richard went on to win the heat his first win of 09’.
Our 4th place finish put us 7th for the feature. This time we were inside behind three very quick cars. Shane Maginnis #03 was incredibly fast in warm ups, in fact he had most of us checking stop watches to see if they were right. Some had him in the 15:2’s, others at 15:16. That would be Super Late Model times and none of us have hardly cracked the 15:3’s although some got close and maybe even in it this week end…but 2’s??? He was on the pole with Richard Holmes outside. Scott Lyons and Jeff Stewart were 2nd and 3rd inside and behind Richard was Paul Howse and Todd Campbell.
I had two advantages in this race. I was on the inside lane and I already knew what it was like to race from outside pole. Odds were in favor of the inside lane pulling away. My mandate was to glue myself to the rear of Jeff Stewart and hope that we would be able to take advantage of the obvious. We entered turn three on the white and I watched for Shane to get on the gas and would use him as my guide rather than Jeff. The Crate engine when slowing down tends to bogg slightly. That would be a big disadvantage on the inside lane. A car four back on the inside would be vulnerable to leave a big gap between himself and the third place car if there was a miscue on the start. As light as that may be it could allow an outside lane car to get down in front of me at the start finish line or just past. Being aware of that made it even more urgent to stay right on Jeff’s tail. Coming off four we stayed together. Going into one I was somewhat relieved that no one tried to get down in front of me. Richard was trying his best to keep up but by the time we were in one Shane was ahead and Scott Lyons was pulling away. Jeff stayed right on Scott and then some mayhem started in the outside as the front two got together causing them to check up as it looked like Richard was heading to the wall. If I backed off Richard could have got down, I drove hard not trying to leave any gap and followed Jeff down the back chute. Richard was now beside the 3rd place car and I was right on Jeff and as we came to completion of the first lap I heard my spotter say clear high indicating I to was past Richard and in 4th. Richard got in behind me and stayed there for a lap or so until Paul Howse got by. Shane checked out. His rocket fuel or whatever he had was working just fine and he pulled away from all of us. Scott ran as hard as he could with Jeff and me right on his tail. Paul soon caught up making it a four car train. This lasted all 30 laps. There was no time for anything but to concentrate on not making any mistakes and wait for either Scott or Jeff to make one so I could get by. Where were all those Delaware fans now, they needed to see me in my environment. It was a good thing I didn’t get bothered by my spotter. I have told him to keep me posted and he did that four times a lap. From about lap 5 to 30 I had a perfect picture of how close Paul was to me. The furthest away was half a car length. Not getting excited or intimidated was a good thing, not wearing out was another although a drink would have been nice. How often do you get into a 30 lap run in any race, usually there is a caution of get a drink. Friday night at Delaware I could have finished a case of water with all the cautions. No chance here and when the white came out we focused on finishing 4th and making sure I didn’t let up at all. If I had Paul could have got into the back of me, but he didn’t. When the checker fell I was so excited, not because I could finally get a drink of water, but because I was in this very intense bumper to bumper race with some of the best.
After the race I went over to Paul and thanked him for running hard and clean. He never hit me once. I got the same from Jeff who appreciated that we didn’t get into him.
I congratulated Terry, Shane’s dad, and he said “Shane could have lit a cigarette”, implying that he was so far ahead with no worries. After the races were over they announced the #03 had been disqualified in tech and that all drivers would move up one spot. That gave Scott Lyons the win and we finished 3rd. It wasn’t clear what took the Maginnis team down. We heard shocks, other illegal devices and possibly more to come. They were dejected and I would have felt bad for them if it was a minor infraction that wouldn’t have had an impact on their performance. But!!! When we’ve turned in the low 15:4’s at best for the past few seasons and maybe into the high 15:3’s and he turns much faster than that it just doesn’t make sense that his disqualification wouldn’t have anything to do with performance. Anyway we’ll take 3rd and love it. It was a great race and too bad it was such a cold night with not to many fans showing up.
Jeff finished 14th. He is slowly getting use to this new class. It’s hard to imagine a racer that has competed against some of the toughest NHRA Funny Car drivers needing time to adjust in a Late Model, but going in circles is different and Jeff will catch on. He is taking care of his equipment allowing him to get more seat time.
Mike Van Slingerland drove his new Camaro in the Thunder Car class. His night was marred with some serious bad luck in the engine compartment. The engine will need to be sent out for inspection with possible valve damage. A punctured rad slowly lost water but did not indicate it on the gauge or make him loose. The lack of water in the engine could be the reason for the damage but we’ll know soon. Mike hurried back from doing two weddings Sunday and was so excited to be driving his beautiful Camaro.
Don’t worry Mike, it will get fixed and you will race again soon.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri May 22, 2009 2:06 pm

May 23rd.....................Flamboro Speedway

Race #4….3rd Flamboro

High Lites
* 16 cars
* Paul Howse wins
* We finish 3rd
* Jeff Lancaster finishes 14th
* 26 laps before first caution

]Results
Heat
#36……..3rd
#9……….6th
Feature
#36…….3rd
#9……...14th

Winnings
#36…$400
#9…..$200

Repairs
check, body damage to #9 (prepare for Delaware)

Crew
Jim, Jason, Perry, Alan

Conclusion
It’s important to my team, that before every race we give it to the Lord. Our prayer is for the safety of every racer, crew or person that comes to the track. We ask for wisdom in what we do to our car, how to get through the race that awaits us, and that we would perform well. However our prayers always end with the request for patience and strength, to conduct ourselves on and off the track in a way that would glorify God. That's our mission and it takes a lot of discipline to get it done every night. We’re not perfect but we’ve been able to follow this mandate in an arena, that allows us to demonstrate our faith by the way we act. Tonight we were tested a little more than normal but justice was served, although it isn't always, and maybe full justice would have come in the way of a black flag for rough driving by one team. Here's how the night went.
Once at the races I refuse to take anything for granted. We may be starting pole in a heat that looks like a sure victory. Our crew know from past experience, not to make the assumption we’re going to win. Incredibly, I race every lap with the understanding that something could go wrong at any second. It could be mechanical, an incident with another racer on the start or during the race. There are endless scenarios that could eliminate or take away a win or a good finish. Knowing that can happen helps reduce the frustration and disappointment if and when it does, however, not totally, but to a degree. That’s why when we finish strong we always rejoice. A top 3 in a heat is good, especially if we started further back. A top 3 in the feature is awesome. Winning a feature is like Christmas morning and we carry that excitement until the next race....if we can sleep.
This past Saturday at Flamboro saw all kinds of issues going on, some testing us more than usual. We ran only one set of warm ups and found the car very good. We were within a few hundreds of the best cars. I decided not to go out in the next set, though our crew chief Jim suggested we scuff in our new tires. Next time he wants that done we’ll do it.
We drew another high number putting us 5th in the second heat. Steve Laking started pole and would win this race with Jason Shaw and I right there. I was very happy for Steve. I’m glad he comes out to race. It has to be tough on him with his precious father Brock, not there, but Steve has a lot of friends who care for him.
After the heat we decided to put on the new tires for the feature, we were starting 5th, 3rd row inside behind Jason who was behind Paul Howse. I wanted the new tires for a few reasons. I knew both Jake and Paul were wearing new shoes and for me to keep up I felt it might to tough without new rubber. It’ not a good idea to put “stickers” on the car for a race. They should have one heat cycle and then staggered for maximum effect. We put them on anyway and Jason let me know they were not sizing up well. He could get the front stagger okay, but the back required some very low tire pressures on the inside to get what we wanted. I asked Perry to check to see if the track was going to give us any hot laps. When he inquired they asked “why, it’s not cold”. Perry rightly stated that some drivers in the heat found the cars a little crazy for a few laps without the pre race warm up. So, at our request the track said they would give us the customary 5 hot laps. That would have been perfect for us to get heat in the tires but it wouldn’t allow us to size them properly. We thought about it, discussed our options and with Late Models lining up and the Thunder Car feature already under way, we needed to make up our minds, and soon. I thought about our heat tires. They had about 6 heat cycles on them. They were the tires we ran on May 2nd when we finished 10th. In my heart I felt they might not keep up, but at least they were ready to race. I finally spoke up, “Okay, lets put on the old tires, save the new ones for the Grisdale Triple Crown race”. The boys went at it getting the tires changed. While sitting in line waiting to go out I talked to Jim, letting him know I was glad we went this way, and he agreed.
We got the hot laps to warm up the tires and were set for the green. Going down the back chute I knew I had to stay right on Jason. He was glued to Paul. Steve Laking was outside pole. He knew the score and would be doing all he could to get down as quick as possible. We were thinking the same thing only reverse, we didn't want to allow anyone to get down in front of us. The start was good and though we didn’t come off the turn as fast as Paul or Jason we did alright. The plan worked for us but Steve was able to get in front of Jason going into turn one. Coming off two we all pulled about the same and when I heard “clear high”, I jumped to the outside lane and set my sights on following Jason who was right on Steve who was right on Paul. The four of us ran this way for 18 or more laps. Our car was very good. We were a little slow coming off but stayed with the lead cars, new tires would have helped us accelerate better off the corner. The race had two distinct packs, the front four and the next group. Jason got by Steve but we were about a car length too far back to follow him. I caught Steve and started to put some pressure on him, as we stayed with the leaders . On about lap 21 I heard that the #03 Maginnis had just passed Jeff Stewart, putting him in 5th. He was 10 plus car lengths behind. We were lapping cars when I heard that he was now 3 car lengths behind. Wow, he gained a lot in one lap. For the next 4 laps he was all over me. On lap 26 coming out of two he hit the back of my car sending our car in what I thought was a sure spin out. My daughter Shirley was sitting in the back chute grand stands with my mom and she said "dad, I can't believe you didn't spin out, your car was totally side ways". I let off the gas massaged the brake pedal and cut the car hard to the right. I was waiting to get hit again but Shane went outside. I was amazed I didn’t spin and raced down the back chute with the Super Late Model outside. As we entered turn three he got sideways. I could have easily dumped him, but that wouldn’t have been the thing to do. Pay back isn’t what we’re about, justice could only be served by beating him in the race or the track officials dealing with him for rough driving. Earlier in the race he ran into Richard Holmes. I don’t know who Richard prays to, or even if he does, in fact, in our class I may be the only one. If I was Shane, I would be careful who I hit or spin. He may want to stop drawing attention to himself. He’s already 3 to 4 tenths faster than any of us which in fact is frustrating track management and most racers. They know how fast the top cars run, and how close we compete within the rules. The #03 has already had to remove some chassis gizmo’s, got disqualified for illegal shocks, and had to add 150 pounds for running a 3” shorter wheel base. In spite of him removing these parts, he’s still way faster than any car at the track. I'm not sure that either Jason or Paul's team realize it yet. They pretty well have the field to themselves on most nights. The odd night they can't pass, or have to settle for a top 5, but usually they are the dominators. If left as is, they won't be dominating anymore, and they'll see that clearly once Shane is able to start with them up front.
Anyway, I backed off from Shane and just as I did the caution came out. That would be the first caution for Late Models in two features. We ran 56 laps caution free. Shane pulled ahead of me while we were under caution, but I knew we’d be going back to the last completed lap. I pulled up on the inside and he pulled ahead, we did that for a few laps. Then the scoreboard showed him in 4th, so I let him in. Soon my spotter and crew chief Jim said “the track is telling us that you are ahead of the #03”. I said “but the scoreboard is showing him ahead of me”. Jim is 6’3” and 230 pounds. “I’m telling you, the track is telling you to get in front of him, so get by him.”…..“yes sir”!! I pulled ahead and then we went to white. On the restart Shane flew off turn four leaving us standing. He was two car lengths ahead before the start finish line. He dove to the low lane and almost piled into the back of Steve. Going down the back chute he dove hard into three and nailed the back of #44 so hard that Steve spun around. I was right there and ran into the back of Maginnis but then cut hard left to go under the spinning Laking. I was blessed on that deal making it through. The dumb deal caused a huge wreck, no one seriously injured or beat up. I'm not sure what the Super Late Model rules are, but usually when you dump someone you go to the back. Shane pulls up under the yellow and goes in front of me again. I’m thinking “he should be at the back, maybe even black flagged, he's beat up 3 cars, plus the others that got wrecked when Steve was turned”. Then I thought if he dumps Jason and then Howse, maybe he will get black flagged and we could win. However the track didn’t miss his infraction and sent him to the back. On the restart, with only four laps to go, our goal was to finish. Things got a little nuts and now was the time to “bring her home”. Plus it would be next to impossible for "rocket man" to come from the rear in 4 laps.

On the restart we stayed with Paul and Jason. The pressure was clearly on Paul as Jason was all over him. Paul has a lot of experience and the fact Jason was trying him every turn for the final laps didn’t fizz the boy and he ended up taking his first win of 09’. Jason finished 2nd and we got an amazing 3rd. Jeff Stewart was right behind us and for the regulars it was a good night.
Jeff Lancaster finished 14th. He was passing cars on the outside. Jeff is learning how to race in a very competitive field and is doing very well. He got t-boned when Steve Laking was found sitting in the middle of turn four and cars jammed on the brakes to avoid him. Jeff got stopped but was sitting side ways when he got hit on the passenger door. It is pretty well done, but he is going to try to restore it. Jeff is doing what he has to do to learn how to run with this class and we want to encourage him to just keep getting laps under his belt and soon he will be running with the pack.
This race night will help us a lot in the points. We may not gain on first, but we won’t fall back staying about 16 points out. This time last year we were already 30 points out of first. There was more good news. We kept our cool, we’re able to save the car in the near spin, had no issues after the race, have very little damage and have 4 new tires ready to use for the Grisdale Triple Crown race.
Next regular race week the top cars will be at the back. The first three nights were heads up. Now we have accumulated points and the handicapping is determined by dividing the number of points you have by the number of nights raced. This will be interesting to see how the cars come through the pack. The track has finally got it right in terms of handicapping. This system should allow cars who finish 6th back to get a shot at starting up front without the top dogs sitting on the pole. I have a feeling we may see more yellows now. It has worked very good with the system we’re using, running heads up, but I don’t really feel that’s fair. The way it will be on June 13th is fair. It will be up to the drivers to be smart and show respect to their peers. If they don’t it’ll be up to the track to show them the exit to the pits.
We will be on display this coming Saturday in Aldershot for the United Way. More on that later.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri Jun 05, 2009 2:06 pm

June 6th.................Flamboro Speedway

Race #5.....(4th Flamboro)

1st Leg Of 75 Lap Grisdale Triple Crown

High Lites
* 24 cars
* Paul Howse top qualifier...rolls dice inverts 8
* Shane Maginnis wins (currently under review)
* Jason Shaw 2nd
* We get 3rd
* David gets the shaft from Flamboro again (there final bad decision)
* Steve Laking..Hard Luck driver of the century

Results
#36
1st Heat.....3rd.....2nd Heat.....1st
Feature......3rd
#9
1st Heat....6th......2nd Heat.....7th
Feature.....19th

Winnings
#36.....$800
#9.......$360

Repairs
find how to get 40 more HP....routine

Crew
Jim, Jason, Perry, Jeff Coates

Conclusion
It was back in the mid late 80’s to mid 90’s that Junior Hanley would have a problem on the track and have to go scratch and then quickly work his way back to the front. His car usually qualified on the pole but something would happen early in the race resulting in him going to the back. Within 25 to 30 laps he was back in the lead because his car was at least half a second faster than the best car. Since 2005 the same group of Late Model drivers have competed at Flamboro and turned times very close to each other. The track figured a way to even the competition by having the cars with better suspension and better transmissions to add weight in hopes of bringing parity. What they didn't figure on, was a car coming out, supposedly within our rules, and making the Late Models look like Thunder Cars....I like Thunder Cars, but they shouldn't, and can't race against Late Models.
Over the winter we totally stripped our car. We replaced wore out parts, rebuilt the transmission and made sure the car set up was perfect. We felt getting out of the gate early was paramount for a run at the title. The rules were basically frozen over the past few seasons, so there was no need to go nuts on new ideas or parts for the car.
Every night so far this season, the top 6 or 7 cars have been within a tenth of each other…..well almost everyone. I’m sure those involved with the #03 of Maginnis would be offended for anyone to suggest they are on the same level as any of the Late Models at Flamboro. They would be right to point out (as everyone of our spotters and those with stop watches already know) that they are at least four to five tenths faster than the top cars. Junior Hanley came from the back to the front many times in his day, smoking the field that was clearly out classed. Last night Shane Maginnis came from last place to first in just under 40 laps passing the elite of Flamboro Late Models on the outside and inside. The more amazing aspect of this feat was that he did it without a caution. By lap 60 the black #03 was in front and cruising, perhaps not wanting to bring attention to himself by being too fast. …"Hey!! Shane…we already knew two weeks ago how fast you were, and last night it wasn’t you winning that brought the obvious to all of us, it was how fast you came through the pack without a yellow".
Here’s the deal. Paul Howse was probably the fastest non "Super Late Model" last night, qualifying on the pole by virtue of two heat wins. Maginnis had two seconds. Paul was the fastest of the regular Late Models, but not by a lot, he was consistently a tenth quicker than most of the regulars. Paul came from the back to 5th and was still 15 car lengths behind the leaders at the end of the race. That would make sense, because he needed a caution or two to catch up. What Maginnis did doesn’t make any sense…well, not if the car is suppose to be playing by the same rules as everyone else.
As it is right now, the race finish is unofficial because of a Tech concern with the winner. The top three cars had to remove their clutch and take it to Tech for inspection. It took Donny Cox three minutes to pass our clutch, the same with Jason Shaw’s. After the Maginnis team took their clutch to Tech, it would be a long 35 minutes before the announcement came over the pit speaker “due to more time needed for Tech, we will not be announcing the official finish of the race until Tuesday”.
What does that mean? Maybe nothing, or maybe whatever the 03 team took to Tech needs clarification, and maybe it passes. If it does pass, that means Tech didn't find what's wrong with the car...or what's illegal with it. There is something about that car that makes it a different Late Model than all of the rest. It’s most likely an ASA car being costumed as a Late Model. I know the staff don’t like it, none of the drivers like it and most fans who watch know theirs is something amiss. What’s next? Maybe pull the engine out and send it to MacMaster Pontiac for inspection. If it passes, have the chassis gone over totally by a builder like Mike McColl or Junior Hanley, and if nothing is found, do a thorough investigation on how much advantage a 102” wheel base, (the 03 car) has over the 105”, that all of us run. If they can't find anything make him drag a sled full of cement behind his car, or add 500 pounds.
Remember, they have already been disqualified by using illegal shocks, have had to remove other gizmo’s and were made add 150 pounds making them 3050 after the feature compared to most of us at 2900, and those with coil over strut suspension 60 more pounds more putting them at 2960. How can any race car add 150 pounds and still smoke the field?
This is a no brainer. Shane should be racing against cars that fit his rules and none of us do. This isn’t fun racing anymore, because we’re not on the same playing field. If Jason, Paul, Jeff, Scott or anyone of the usual suspects are going faster than us, we can generally catch up by feature time. In the case of the 03, we can only catch up 5 minutes after the race is over.
One thing he should stop doing, since he’s clearly miles faster than everyone else, is running into cars to get them sideways. It doesn’t make sense that a car with such a huge advantage needs to push people out of the way. If he keeps that up someone might retaliate…oh, wait...someone did and got black flagged for it.

This was added June 11th
We have yet to draw a good number in 09’, but with double heats it really doesn’t matter because if you start last in one race, you start pole in the next and that’s what happened to us.
After warm ups we were fairly happy with the car. We were in the ball park, but not overly quick compared to the regular runners.
We started at the rear of our first heat and got lucky in the low lane. We followed Jason who was on Steve Laking. Once out of traffic the 3 of us kept together. Steve ran a very strong race claiming the first of 6 heats to be run. Paul Howse won his first race and Shane Maginnis won his. The second round of qualifying was a matter of strategy, tension and as we already know, some political drama.
In our 2nd heat we started outside pole with Jason right behind us. We got the lead going into one. My spotter informed me that Jason was right behind. No surprise there. The good news for me was hearing he was 3 car lengths behind with four to go. The win was our first of 09’ and gave us a decent qualifying run with a 1st and 3rd. Jason now had a 1st and 2nd putting him ahead of us. The deal was once qualifying was done the overall winner would throw two dice to determine the invert. I don’t think I like that, but with 75 laps it’s okay.
The second heat was a season changing event for David and his team. After being hit a few times in the first heat by race winner Maginnis, he was determined not to allow Shane to do the same again. Unfortunately he would have no control of that. Jeff Stewart was on the pole, Richard Holmes outside pole, Mark Burbrige 2nd row inside, Shane 2nd row outside and then David starting 5th. Racers usually can tell when their in trouble or if they’re in what looks like a good lane. Richard maybe felt he was in trouble because he was outside of the hard charging and very fast Kabota car. Jeff, up until the past few weeks has been the faster car in Late Models since 2005. When his handling is on he is usually unbeatable, although we are so close anyone can win up front...also up until a few weeks ago. Richard knew what awaited him, but he wasn’t about to mail it in, anything could happen on the start of the race, and Richard had to be ready. Perhaps more intimidating to Richard may have been Maginnis on his tail. Shane already roughed up Richard two weeks prior for being too slow and this situation begged a little patience from the black 03. Meanwhile Jeff knew it was his to win if things went normal . Mark and David knew if Jeff got ahead of Richard they should be able to follow Jeff and not allow Richard to get down. Exactly what happened won’t be known for sure until we watch the incident on Cogeco Cable Friday night, but our team will be in Delaware and will miss it, someone might tape it for us, however, the video will show one way or the other what went down. Here’s what I think. Jeff got the jump off four, Richard fell half a car length back, Burbridge glued himself to Jeff and David likewise to Mark. Shane was dropping back and getting freight trained. He gambles with a move between Richard and the 2nd place car. He needs to do this so he won’t get too far behind, but in order to do it he the three wide move forces him to pinch low and he runs into David who is on the inside. David holds on to his position as Richard goes high forced into the marbles. David and Shane make contact leaving a long rubber trail down the right side of the #37. Maginnis backs out and proceeds to follow David. The starter warns the group as they come by to complete lap one and David thinks for certain that warning is for Shane. For the next two laps Shane gets into David and turning him slightly sideways on the straight. David moves up, lets Shane by and then blasts in behind him to give him the bumper with full intentions of spinning him out. The plan works and the starter gives David the black flag, which he knew he would get because he slowed down in turn four to go to the back. Mission accomplished. The deliberate dumping was all David wanted for the way he was treated in the previous heat and the first lap of this race.
The race continued with Shane getting to 2nd place and setting his sites on Jeff Stewart. Within a few laps he was all over the Kabota King. On the last lap of the heat something happened to the 03, he slowed up very quickly just past the start finish line. It looked as though something broke. Meanwhile Richard and David are barreling in and they split Shane with Richard going high and David low. It then appeared that Maginnis thought it was the end of the race instead of the last lap because once those two past him he sped up and would cross the line in fourth. David and Richard were sent to tech. Terry Maginnis came storming into the tech garage and said... “you’re f#*^’d David”! David answerd “maybe, but I know what the white flag means”.
David went to the tower to ask if he was disqualified, because some said he was, but didn't understand how he could be because he was sent to tech by the track corner staff...plus had he been blacked from the race he should have got a second black flag, but he didn’t. He was told by Bob Munroe that he was scored 2nd, not disqualified. David was happy and returned to his pit. However, shortly after that, things went terribly wrong. He was summoned to the tower again and told he was disqualified for rough driving. Now, that’s not as bad as told you won the feature, then told you didn’t as happened early in 08’ but it’s still evident the staff either have it in for David or just can’t be consistent with what they say they’re going to do. When asked for the reason he was disqualified he was told it was for running into Shane on lap one as the cars entered turn one. Seems odd when the inside car had the lane, but that was the call. When challenged by the call, and noting that the last time the Late Models were here the same car in question spun out Steve Laking and was sent to the back, not disqualified. The answer to that “we have to start somewhere with disqualifying drivers and you are the first”.
David’s 12 man crew all agreed to load the car and not run. I felt bad for David as did most of his competitors. Some felt as I did that he should go out and show his stuff, but he was heart broken beyond belief. He was told that tow money was $150. To take one lap in the feature was $360, so he took the one lap.
Paul Howse was the overall winner in qualifying with two wins. Paul had the duty of throwing the dice to see what the invert would be. He was hoping for “snake eyes”, but threw his car number…8.
That put us 5th with Scott Lyons on the pole and Jeff Stewart right behind. The race went one lap and a caution fell. Richard Holmes was hit in turn three and spun around. Paul Howse was sent to the back as was Shane for being involved. On that restart we were 5th outside of Jason Shaw. We ran outside until turn four on the next lap then tucked in behind Jason. The top 5 were Lyons, Stewart, Laking, Shaw and us. Watching ahead….Delaware is making us change our rear spoiler to clear glass. I asked why, because we have advertising on it, they said so other drivers can see through your spoiler, through the back window etc so they can see what’s going on up front. I responded WHAT!!!...I could see (not through Jason’s spoiler) Jeff all over Scott as the five of us ran into each turn. Jeff tried a few times, then on lap 10 he hit Scott shoving him up allowing Steve to make a move low on the inside. Scott was high in four when Jeff and Steve got by. As Steve exited turn four both he and Jeff got together causing a wild wreck at the start finish line and resulting in both cars being eliminated. What a shame, there’s no way that had to happen and from my vantage point I couldn’t see much because I was in the middle of trying follow Jason past Scott. Sparks flew, Steve mounted the wall backwards and both cars came to rest in turn one.
That put us 3rd with a lot of breathing room. For the next 35 laps we stayed within a few car lengths of the front two. Jason was hounding Scott and it was clear the #52 was doing all he could to hold on to first. By lap 48 I was very thirsty but there was no yellow and definitely no time to go hunting for the plastic tube to get a drink. Soon my spotter said “the 03 is in 4th about 10 car lengths behind”. The very next lap he said “the 03 is three car lengths behind”. I didn’t have to think very long about this situation. There were 25 laps left and we were running (what I thought) was fairly decent. How did he catch up so fast with us out front in a non stop race? Howse was still 7th at this time. Anyway, I was warned by his dad not to block or I’d be getting more of what we got a few weeks ago when we were turned slightly in the feature on May 23rd. I pointed out the window to let Shane know to pass us on the inside. Intimidated or smart? I went high in turn three, Shane went under, and I followed him for about 3 feet off turn four until he pulled away. He caught Jason and Scott and within two laps was by Jason. Randy told me they also let him go without much fight. Had their been 5 laps left I wouldn’t have done that unless my car was so bad I thought I would be spun. Shane got into 2nd place and then got into Scott getting him sideways and allowing Jason to get by him again. This was the part of the race where everyone thought it was the best race in the past 20 years. It’s true it was exciting, but only because one of the three cars was much quicker than the rest. Once Jason got by Shane he had no choice but to force Scott to go. Jason got into Scott and got him lose going into three. The previous two laps of banging and checking up allowed us to catch back up. Jason went under Scott towing Maginnis. I went high on the front chute and dove in behind the 03 to follow them off turn two. Shane got by Jason a lap later on the inside like he was passing a Thunder Car (no offence to Jason or Thunder Cars). That was it the excitement and race was over. We were pushing a little with 30 laps to go but a lot with 10 to go and were more than happy to finish 2nd (well, that’s if you don’t count the 03).
The 3rd place finish gave us our 3rd podium finish in a row at Flamboro. It will also give us a good chance at the Grisdale Triple Crown championship.
The word is that Maginnis will have to change his car. Not sure what that means. We had to change our headers because they weren’t legal, they may have made no difference power wise, but they didn’t meet the rules. If the 03 isn’t legal he should have to make it right soon. He took $2000, which seems very unfair when his car is not within the rules. I trust the Tech staff to figure it out and get us evened up rules wise.
We are running the #9 at Delaware this Friday. Thatcher Krupp came over Wednesday night and found some things wrong with the car. Junior Hanley is going to straighten our quick change tube that’s bent quite a bit. That should help both Jeff Lancaster and I in getting this car around the corners.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:06 pm

June 12th....................Delaware Speedway

Race #6 (2nd Delaware)

High Lites
* 28 cars
* Scott Lindsay wins first 30 lap feature
* Jamie Ramsay wins 2nd 30 lap
* Race was a one race payout based on overall finish of both
* No heats

Results
Time Trial
#9....20:081
#37..19:687
1st Feature
#9.....19th
#37...11th
2nd Feature
#9.....11th
#37....19th

Winnings
#9.....
#37...

Repairs
None...routine

Crew
Jeff, Jason, Alan, Ken, Linda, Dave Sean

Conclusion
During the week we went over the #9 Late Model quite thoroughly. I invited Thatcher, our former Crew chief, and the team manager of Anthony Simone’s NASCAR Canadian Tire race program, to give us an overview of our new Late Model. Jeff Lancaster was having serious problems with the Freedom Village Impala on June 6th at Flamboro and perhaps it was time to get a professional second opinion of all I had done or was doing wrong on this car.
After squaring and checking some simple suspension set up it was determined the car need caster and camber adjustments, but more than that, the quick change was bent, by 5/16 of an inch. I immediately called Junior Hanley at Thatcher’s suggestion, to ask if he would put his magic on it. He agreed to do it on Thursday morning. Once that was fixed the assembly was reinstalled in the car and Thatcher returned Thursday night to scale the car. I would be driving it at Delaware, and I didn’t want to go through the things I did last time there by being so loose, plus Jeff was having problems with the car and there was no way it was because of his driving, there was definitely something wrong with the car and thanks to the work done we hoped we got it right.
We got to the track in plenty of time. All of us were anticipating what the car would be like. Driving at Delaware for me is a totally different deal than Flamboro. I know I’m competitive at Flamboro, but we are not competitive at Delaware and consider a top 10 awesome if not lucky. The only way to change that is to get on the track more often and drive the car harder bringing those numbers on the score board down each week so we at least are somewhere in the ball park, we hoped tonight would start that process.
Our first let down was in tech. The car was too low, by a quarter of an inch, and that’s a lot. The Tech guys were happy we changed our exhaust and only had one request, to change our rear spoiler glass. I agreed to do that.
Once in our pit pad we started to change load bolts because our ride height was off. We backed off the pan hard bar and began to turn what looked like a decent race car (by the way it was sitting) into a nightmare. It seemed the more we turned, nothing was happening. Finally we got it close and headed out for warm ups. The car was loose but not as bad as it was the last time I was here. In the next warm ups I found the brakes not very good and wanted to do something to give better brake pedal. I was worried now. We spent 2 days getting this car set up properly and we could tell we were in trouble. It showed very big in hot laps. After a terrible 20:081 I spun out going into one on our 2nd timed lap. That was it for me. Returning to the pits we decided to put on the old tires and use the first 30 lap as a test race and hopefully do something about the chassis between the two features. Jeff and Ken bled the brakes but there was no sign of air in the lines.
We started last in the first race and would end up 19th, but not because of us moving up, more because others were moving out. We had a few good laps, but the car was loose in the turns and hard to drive. The worst thing, or the most notable, was the way the car looked, as though it was being picked up by a tow truck. The right front had to be 8” off the ground. The main goal was not to wreck the car after the first feature. We accomplished that feat, now we had to decide what to do with the chassis.
Every one of us could see the car was jacked up way too high on the right side. I talked to Jeff Lancaster and told him I wanted to get the car right for him for Flamboro and it was terrible. I was beginning to feel my ambitions for a good season at Delaware were a day dream and maybe this exercise of trying to be as good here as we were at Flamboro was impossible, so my focus had to be on getting the car right for Jeff. However, I didn’t do all of this planning for 2009 to give up on being competitive at the big oval but clearly my heart was leaning to getting the car better for Jeff.
I asked Jeff not to tell Thatcher what we were doing because we were about to go nuts on the load bolts. The chassis heights were too low on the left and too high on the right. We could not go on the scales again to check the numbers, so this entire process of turning bolts and setting the bar was going to be based on what I learned over the past few years and applying it to what we knew was wrong. I had two goals, get the ride height correct and then go by the general look of the car to establish if we were close. That's like a house builder throwing a rock on a piece ground, and if the rock don't roll the ground must be flat...that's the best comparison I can come up with....I just had a thought...what if the rock wasn't round? Fair question! So the builder throws a soft ball.

After about 20 minutes of moving load bolts, we were back to Thatcher’s original set up and proceeded to get the ride height correct. Since we could not go back on the scale the wedge % had to be guessed. We put on our second set of tires and reduced the rear stagger by an inch. I didn’t want to be loose again and this was our best hope because we were very loose in the middle. A track bar adjustment would have been done if the car was a little loose but it was serious loose.

I wanted to go scratch in the race but they lined us starting 18th. I told the crew I’d be coming back in before the green. After one cruise lap I pulled back into my pit pad and asked Jeff for directions and he gave me what I needed to know, but now I had to go to the back of the pack and we were all good with that.
On the green I knew within two laps that I was driving a different car. The first caution came out on about lap 3 and I was excited and let the crew know the car was good, thanking them for their efforts. By lap 8 and 9 the car and was making some ground. This was the best I had ever driven on this track on 8” tires. By the half way mark we were 17th and still improving. The car could go anywhere. With 10 laps to go we lined up 15th and passed a few cars going into one moving us to 12th and then followed the #72 to run with him and another group of cars lead by Kirk Hooker. Kirk was about 12 car lengths ahead of us in 6th place. The brakes were very bad, fading into each turn as the race continued. I was backing off too soon and unable to be aggressive any longer. We stayed where we were and brought the car home in 11th place. We had turned some times in the 19:5's and we were slowly getting better.
Wow, you would have thought we were in the top 3 after I got to the pits. The crew were incredibly excited, I’m sure because the car looked and ran so much better.

I’ve raced with these drivers before at Flamboro and Sauble and done well, but not at this bigger track. It will take time but I’m hoping for a top 5 with the goal of a top 3 by the end of this season.
It was a good night for us and not a mark on the car.
Congrats to Scott Lindsay and Jamie Ramsay for their wins. It was Jamie’s first win at the track. David finished 11th in the first race and had some bad luck in the 2nd losing two tie rods on two different occasions.

Gary
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:52 pm

Post by Gary » Fri Jun 12, 2009 2:06 pm

June 13th..............Flamboro Speedway

Race #7 (5th Flamboro)

High Lites
* 15 cars
* Paul Howse wins
* We finish 6th
* Jeff Lancaster has best finish of season with an 11th
* Pre race drivers meeting gets heated
* Maginnis explains why he's so fast, and predicts he will finish 2nd

Results
Heat
#36......4th
#9........6th

Feature
#36.......6th
#9.......11th

Winnings
#36....$240
#9......$215

Repairs
Routine on both cars....reset up #36

Crew
Jim, Jason, Marty, Sarah

Conclusion
It’s slowly becoming less fun for me to race at Flamboro. There use to be a feeling of excitement going to this icon of race tracks. A few issues have got me down. The track reducing our pay out for regular nights as well as the Grisdale Triple Crown. The issue with Shane’s car has been eating me up. I was beginning to feel that I was the only voice from the drivers who would say anything. Some racers only speak up if the infraction, bad call or track issue affects them. I can’t be the Late Model watch dog for every issue, like pay off, inconsistent calls, unfair or improper race procedures. I would exhaust myself to the point where I can’t race anymore…not here.
On Saturday we got to the track early enough for two sets of warm ups. We had better times on the older tires. Our times were in the low 15:5’s on the old tires, could not get in the 4’s.
We went back to the new tires but our times were worse, so we decided to stick with the old tires for tonight. I had another bad draw putting us last in the heat, so that deal hurts when heat races count for points and there’s only one heat. You could win the championship based on the luck of the draw, but we’ve asked for double heats to make it fair and the track said no.
The drivers meeting was an eye opener for me. Last weeks explosion of commentary regarding the Maginnis car has done two things. It’s made some people more concerned and made others think different. Those concerned include track staff. I believe after the meeting in the garage the head of Tech will do something about bringing parity to this class. We’ve never had an issue in the past four years, so I’m sure he is upset to have to go through this garbage, but he is doing it as he says “there is a process and I’m working it through”.
Jeff Stewart made it clear that he isn’t blind. He asked two questions at the meeting. 1) “How many times has anyone passed Jason Shaw when he’s been leading the race”? 2) “ How many drivers have started at the rear of a race on a restart and with no cautions, came from the back to the front with 15 laps to go”? Shane didn’t know the first question was pointed at him but he sure knew the second one was referring to last weeks feature.
Shane said “what do you want me to do, load up”? YES!!!… well no one said that, but then Donny Cox jumped in and basically took over not allowing the meeting to get out of hand. He said “I have to run this track for 24 racers not for the feelings of one”? That’s when I shouted “hey, most of us agree with Jeff, he’s speaking for all of us”. The meeting got a little nuts until of all people Jim Sweers brought peace. That was good because usually Jim is the one in the middle of the storm but not in this issue he was the peace maker (usually my role).
After the meeting some of us talked to Donny and he said our concerns are being addressed and for us to trust him…and I do. I just hope John lets him do his job.
Shane was talking to one of our elite drivers and he said to me “hey, you can’t black ball the guy, he’s making me work harder on my car”! I couldn’t believe it so I said “ ya, well, you’re still 3 tenths slower”. Then I said to Shane “I have no issue with you racing with us as long as you are racing the same car under the same rules”. Shane then explained to me why he is so much faster. “I use to run Super Late Models and turned the track in the high 14’s, I’m not use to going this slow, so I drive harder”.....I thought....Hey, that’s a good one, that explains it right?....“come off it Shane, the tire and engine combination won’t allow that. We have a chip to take us to 6300, the tires can only go so hard with the weight we carry, and you have more”. Here's a fair comparison. My Hobby car is about 1+ seconds slower than our Late Model. When I drove it I did experience the feeling of being much slower. It seemed to me with the CVM, I could have gone a lot faster. However there was no way my Coupe would go 4 tenths faster just because I was use to going faster. If it had slicks on it, I could have taken it down from 16:6 to 16:2 but that wouldn't have been fair because slicks are not legal to run on a Vintage Mod.
Shane left and soon his dad came back asking for me and wanted to take me to see their car. “Tell Gary to come to my car and I’ll show him why we’re 4 tenths faster”!!!! Man, I thought they were only 3 tenths faster. Anyway I didn’t go.
It bothers me that the con job is on. Here’s how it works and gets played out, and some of the things I see happening.
* some teams start to feel sorry for the 03
* some teams start to defend him
* the 03 lets other top cars know he respects them
* the 03 tells us there are two cars just as fast as him
* some believe it
* the owner really wants him to run, says he puts on a great show
* the announcers are praising him as the new kid on the block
* the regulars are being called sucks and are afraid of him
* he can back off anytime, let us think we are just as fast
* he controls the race because of his power and speed
* the longer he runs with us the more he becomes accepted

On a much bigger scale, that’s how a dictator takes over a country.
Anyway, I must leave this to man who can make it right. I do know this. The car has to weight almost as much as a Monster Truck by next week. Two hundreds pounds heavier than most of us. He will have to make other changes to his car by the end of the month and sooner or later the engines on the top 5 or 6 cars will be checked thoroughly and Tech will zero in on what is or isn’t legal on the car.
Starting last in our heat meant the only way to go was forward. We did catch up to 4th and ran hard with Richard Holmes who was hounding Scott Lyons. Meanwhile Jason Shaw was long gone and would claim another heat win for 2009. Paul Howse won the first heat.
The feature was frustrating for us as we discovered after the heat that our chassis was too low on the left side and way high on the right. We had to redo the chassis almost like what we did at Delaware. After messing with every load bolt to get the ride height right, we took the car to the scales and found our wedge way low. We brought it back and with the help of Thatcher who made some other changes to bring the wedge up.
We started 5th in the feature and we’re looking to maybe claim our first win, but for certain to get another top 3 finish. Unfortunately our car was way off. We were extremely loose entering the corner and hadn’t had that scenario for over a year. We were quickly falling back and when fell to 8th the yellow came out for Scott Lyons who lost a wheel bearing. I headed for the pits letting my crew know I was dangerous loose. Jim asked Jason to add a turn and a half on the bar, but I changed it to 2 full turns. We went back out. I was asked in the pits “wasn’t your car tight”? No, it was loose, the reason it looked like it was pushing is because of a quick counter steer going into three that caused a push, but it was brought on by me compensating.
We returned in lots of time and restarted at the rear. For the next four or five laps I was in a battle with the much improved #5 of Shane Woodside. I had a severe problem now, we were hitting the chip half way down the chutes, taking away fast corner entry. Finally I went outside of Thane but as we went into turn one I cut down too much not giving him enough room. I dove in front of his wheel and our car spun. At first I thought it was Thane’s fault for not giving me room but when talking to him after it became clear it my fault for chopping him. Regardless of that, I did praise him for running very well. In fact, after the race was over I asked my crew who was driving the #5 because there were no sponsors on the car only a number and I thought maybe Thane sold the car, but it was him. For a driver who only comes out once in a while he was very impressive.

The Handicapping
For the past 4 years they had systems that were doomed to be figured out and taken advantage of, systems where a sandbagger would prosper, yet they refused to change it. This year they got it right and for the remainder of the season we’ll see our top cars start at the rear and the lowest points average car start up front where they should. It is still possible for a car to take advantage for one night. A driver can come out and finish last or not start the feature and have a very low point average. That will put him pole the next week, but if he finishes high he will make a huge impact on his average sending him to the middle or further back.

This Weeks Feature Was One Of The Best For Action
On the restart we were bunched more than usual. Junior Farley #72 was the early leader with lots of company. Ted Horsfall driving the new #49 was one car who was right in the thick of it. Paul Howse managed to get into 3rd after getting by a struggling 36 (that would be us, but we left and fixed it). On a restart early the cars were so slow coming off turn four that Horsfall got turned around. The yellow came out and Ted got his spot back, maybe because the race had not started yet. It was fair to give him the spot. On the next restart we went hard into turn one and the cars started bunching up and next thing you know Paul is sitting sideways in turn one and we are coming in hard at just under 200 mph. I had to quickly figure out which way to go but the top was closed and so I slowed down, locked them up a bit then turned hard towards the infield. Our car went almost 90 degrees with our passenger side headed for the passenger side of the #8. I have no idea why we didn’t hit but I’m thankful we didn’t and though Paul didn’t know what mayhem avoided him, Tara did and told him after the race.
We came out lucky but were still at the back. The next ten laps were racing chaos. Cars were doubled up everywhere. This had to be a far more exciting race to watch as battles were fought from first to tenth. Maginnis got to 2nd and was under the leader but for some reason took a long time to pass Junior, and that’s no shot at Junior. Another caution came out when the 3 of Chris Boschler spun in turn one after making contact with Jason. Paul Howse got around and so did Jeff Stewart and we were able to go high. That put us in 8th for the next restart. Coming off turn four once again cars made contact. Someone said the leader was very slow. It ended up costing Junior a bunch of spots as he got hit a couple of times then spun to the infield. There was no caution. The battle tightened as the first four rows doubled up. Paul Howse followed Horsfall for a few laps then went outside getting by going into three. Jason would follow suit. Howse caught and got under the 03 of Maginnis passing him clean and taking the lead. We were able to follow Jeff Stewart past Richard Holmes but could not get by the #49. We ended 6th following Jeff across the finish line in a very hard fought close battle.
There are no races for Late Models next week, so we’ll do everything we can to find a few hundreds in the 36 and hope to come out and take a checker on the 27th.
Congrats to Paul and his team they worked hard for that win.

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